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Why Switch from Dimensional Lumber to Light Gauge Steel?

  • switch-from-lumber-to-steel-004_0028Lumber price instability, in some cases lumber price was doubled in a very short time.
  • Low quality of the available lumber these days.
  • High contents of sugar in today’s lumber make it vulnerable to termite and mold.
  • Health reasons: Mold problemFrom Sundays 8/7c on ABC Watch BluWood make a sensational international debut on the Oct. 1 episode of ABC’s Extreme Makeover: Home Edition as it frames a new home for Maryann Gilliam in Michigan.Maryann’s husband tragically passed away last year leaving her to raise six children. Her family’s doctor theorizes mold and toxins found in the home may been responsible for his death. Solve the mold problem before it starts by using light gauge steel for your new home.
  • Air Quality:
    Over 200 million tons of waste straw are produced each year in the U.S. alone! Most of the wasted straw is burnt. Building with the waste product of our farms keeps the air clean.
  • Since wood changes dimension based on the humidity in the air, after few years of construction, a typical wood house will show some cracks and deterioration.This is where the energy loss starts.
  • Light gauge steel studs and joists are straighter with accurate dimensions than lumber. This makes it easier to install and to attached sheathing for walls, floor and roof. Lumber has very low, bad, fire resistance.

Look carefully at the picture below. What is left after fire in a wood building?

What is left and survived the fire is the non combustible material such as steel and concrete.

Fire goes very fast through wood/lumber house that some members of the family can not escape the fire and unfortunately die in the fire.

Compare this to the minimum damage that happened to that steel home shown below. Below are picture of a steel home after an intense fire in the garage from a car.

switch-from-lumber-to-steel-028_0004Jackson County, Oregon, Emergency Management Advisory Council says:  

  • The State of Oregon had 13,603 fires in 2004 which resulted in 41 deaths and $129.6 million in property damage.
  • Nation wide, at least 6,000 people die in fires each year and an additional 100,000 are injured.
  • Senior citizens and children under five are at highest risk.
  • Fire is fast and deadly, emitting smoke and gases that can render a person unconscious within minutes. It is the most likely disaster that Jackson County families will experience
  • Save our forests:
    • Constructing a typical house requires more than an acre of trees, and generates four pounds of construction waste per square foot.
    • Using alternative materials such as light Gauge/ cold-formed steel will help to preserve and save our forests.